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Skål! Swedish snacks with a difference

Sweden is one of the longing countries of the Germans. In the country itself, Germans make up the second largest group of foreign tourists behind Norway. Lonely forests, enchanted lakes, a penchant for design, and a fundamentally friendly image attract travelers to the north. There's just one downer for some: alcohol is very, very expensive in Sweden.

Trend toward regional products

All the more surprising, then, that Sweden, of all countries, will be represented at the International Green Week 2023 with, among other things, numerous spirits. "We've put a focus on sustainability this year," says project manager Lina Galow. "The trend in Sweden is also toward regional products and good ingredients." And, apparently, toward craft beverages.

For example, among the 20 or so producers exhibiting at the national stand in Hall 8.2 are seven craft breweries pouring a variety of organic beers. They belong to "Föreningen Sveriges Oberoende Bryggerier," the association of craft beer breweries in Sweden.

Experiments with gin

Directly across the street is Stockholms Bränneri - Stockholm's first craft distillery, which has been producing gin since 2016. Founding couple Anna and Calle Wikner brought the idea back from time away in Canada. "We love gin ourselves," says Calle Wikner. "Above all, gin is a drink that you can make a lot of." Stockholms Bränneri uses only local ingredients, and this then produces creations such as the "Pink Gin" based on rhubarb, cranberries and rose petals, or the "Dry Gin" with elderflower, rosemary and lemon.

Drinking like the Nobel Prize

Also founded in 2016, craft cider brewer Pomologik has earned a top reputation in the industry in the few years since. "We work exclusively with Swedish dessert apples and without any additives during fermentation, which makes our cider quite unique," explains CEO Patrik Svensk.Pomologik now has 24 different cider varieties on offer - and regularly wins medals for them both nationally and internationally. At the last Nobel Prize winners' dinner, the non-alcoholic "Hantverkscider" was served.

Moose burger and chanterelle chutney

With so much wonderful alcohol, of course there has to be something to eat. Moose sausage, for example. Or the moose burger, for the creation of which seven Swedish eco-manufacturers have joined forces. Sörgården Måla offers a small bite to eat over the counter - a real treat for the palate: trumpet chanterelle chutney on wild garlic cheese and toasted oat cookies.

The delicacies from Sweden and the Swedish attitude to life get visitors in Hall 8.2.

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